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Keeping It Green
Updated: Nov. 14, 2017
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Climate Change

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Family Planning
Slows Climate Change

Climate Law Institute
Saving Life on Earth

The Fourth National
Climate Assessment

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National Park?

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Of Intrerest
  • Dems Stage Revolt at Climate Summit Top Democrats Stage Anti-Trump
    Revolt at Bonn Climate Summit

    Nov. 11, 2017 - A handful of Democratic governors and scores of other lawmakers and mayors are mounting an insurgency at the United Nations climate conference here, orchestrating a highly choreographed campaign to persuade world leaders that President Donald Trump doesn’t speak for the United States on climate change.

    Click now for the Politico article.

  • A Climate Change Debate Presented at a Meeting of the Humanists of Sarasota Bay, Sarasota, FL. on Nov.1, 2017

    Nov. 3, 2017 - Barry Zack, the editor of this website made his ideas known to a group of sophisiticated attendees. His opponenet is a PhD with different ideas as to what is really responsible for Climate Change, and all of its ramifications,

    Click to read the presentation.

  • The NY Times Answers CC Questions Climate Change Is Complex.
    We’ve Got Answers to Your Questions.

    Sept. 19, 2017 - Questions in Three Parts


    1. What is Happening?

    2. How Much Trouble Are We In?

    3. What Can We Do?

    These questions answered: Click now.

  • Heat Waves to Hurricanes What We Know About Extreme
    Weather and Climate Change

    Sspt. 15, 2017 - It’s been a hectic end to summer, meteorologically speaking.

    Back-to-back hurricanes raked Texas, Florida and the Caribbean. A Labor Day heat wave broke temperature records in San Francisco and strained California’s electricity grid. Wildfires continue to rage in the Pacific Northwest.

    This string of extreme events has brought new focus to a familiar question: Is climate change to blame?

    Clicj to read the NY Times
    article, and find out.

  • Climate Change in Photographs Photo Collections From
    The Climate Reality Project

    Aug. 25, 2017 - A collection of photos by the Climate Reality team - a nonprofit organization leading the fight against the climate crisis.

    To view it, click now.

  • When Rising Seas Hit Home Hard Choices Ahead for Hundreds
    of US Coastal Communities

    There comes a threshold of chronic flooding that makes normal routines impossible and forces communities to make difficult, often costly choices.

    Click now to see the report from the
    Union of Concerned Scientists.

  • The Importance of Mangroves Carbon-Rich Mangroves
    Help Control Climate Change

    Better protecting the world’s fast-disappearing mangroves could have big economic, social and environmental benefits, experts said at the U.N. climate talks in Lima back in 2014.

    Besides protecting shorelines from extreme weather and providing fish a safe place to breed, mangroves could play a big role in trapping climate-changing carbon emissions, something that has so far been largely overlooked, they said.

    Click for the complete article.

  • The Climate Accountability Scorecard Ranking Major Fossil Fuel Companies on
    Climate Deception, Disclosure, and Action

    An in-depth analysis of eight leading fossil fuel companies finds that none of them has made a clean break from disinformation on climate science and policy.

    Click to read the report
    from the Union of Concerned Scientists

  • Graph: The Relentless Rise in CO2Virw the NASA Graph
    Showing CO2 Rise

    The current warming trend is of particular significance because most of it is extremely likely (greater than 95 percent probability) to be the result of human activity since the mid-20th century and proceeding at a rate that is unprecedented over decades to millennia.

    Earth-orbiting satellites and other technological advances have enabled scientists to see the big picture, collecting many different types of information about our planet and its climate on a global scale. This body of data, collected over many years, reveals the signals of a changing climate.

  • Antarctica Like You've Never Seen It 100-Year-Old Photos Reveal Antarctica Like You've Never Seen It

    July 14, 2017 -With our polar regions rapidly shrinking—and more bad news this week—it can make one nostalgic for an Antarctica that was, well, intact.

    The windiest, coldest, and driest place on Earth, the continent has long attracted explorers on a quest for adventure. National Geographic Magazine in particular has a history of fascination with Antarctica, publishing its first story on the region in 1894.

    Click now for the show.

  • Al Gore Is Back At It An Inconvenient Sequel

    We provide a link to the former Vice President's latest film. The climate has not exactly improved since his original film, but, in fact, has gotten far worse. The time to act is long overdue.

  • Dutch Solution to Rising Seas The Dutch Have Solutions to Rising Seas.
    The World Is Watching.

    June 15, 2017 - In the waterlogged Netherlands, climate change is considered neither a hypothetical nor a drag on the economy. Instead, it’s an opportunity.

• Site Map   • Welcome Page
• Climate News
Magnifying Glass

The Causes and Consequences?
Click on a subject for more information.
• Animal Consumption      • Carbon Pollution
• Concrete's Carbon Footprint   • Deforestation
      • Ice Meltdown      • Population Growth    
• Poor Regulation    • Sea-Level Rise
• 6 Things You Can Do About Climate ChangeVideo Cam
Global Warming Report from NOAA
National Climate Change Assessment
Another Good Global Warming Resource
Nat. Geographic Climate Change News
Climate Change Resources
  • Before and After Images These Before and After Images Show the
    Startling Effects of Climate Change

    A U.N.-backed study, published in January, concluded that unless we take swift action to curb greenhouse gas emissions, coral bleaching events — like the one that resulted in a major die-off at Australia’s Great Barrier Reef — will soon decimate nearly all of the world’s coral reefs.

    Click for the story and a slideshow.

  • What Can We Do for the Climate Ask Not What Your Climate
    Can Do for You. Ask What
    You Can do for Your Climate

    From the Humanist.com, June, 2017: While the federal government is becoming a follower rather than a leader on climate change, we can fight on the state, local, and personal levels to achieve huge reductions in greenhouse gases.

  • Predicting San Francisco in 2075 View a Map After a
    Catastrophic Rise in Sea Levels

    Far in the future, San Francisco's Divisadero Street is a cruise-ship harbor, taco trucks have become taco boats, and the Mission District is a beloved site for scuba diving. That's the waterlogged vision of cartographer Brian Stokle and Bay Area blog Burrito Justice, who've made a fantasy map of the city post-200 feet of sea-level rise.

    Is it just a fantasy? Click and have a look.

  • Peatlands and Climate Change The Role of Peatlands
    to Combat Climate Change

    The human impact on global climate and the role of peatlands has been widely studied and debated in media, but also within a scientific audience and peatland experts during recent years.

  • Remembering the 2016 News Climate Change News
    That Stuck With Us in 2016

    As the year ended, The New York Times asked reporters who have focused on climate change, global warming and the environment to choose the news they reported on that was the most memorable. These are their selections, ranging from sea level rise to the phenomenon of “rolling coal” to local actions to confront a warming planet.

  • SRQ Climate Change Meet Up Sarasota Climate Change Meet Up

    Are you concerned about climate change? Do you suspect you’re the only one? Join us and learn you’re not alone. Got answers about climate change? Share them. We want to hear. Got questions about climate change? Share them. Maybe there’s an answer. Is anybody in Sarasota doing anything about climate change? If so, what? If not, why not? Got ideas? Let’s talk about them.

  • 6 Climate Leaders Tell Their Story Discover Your Purpose
    Learn from the Leaders

    Trained by The Climate Reality Project Founder and Chairman Al Gore and renowned climate scientists and communicators from around the world, our Climate Reality Leaders shape the conversation on climate science in forums from family dinners to international summits to tell the story of the climate crisis and build a twenty-first century movement for solutions.

  • Reasons for Mass Migrations Protection For People Displaced
    Across Borders and
    The Effects Of Climate Change

    Every year around the world, millions are forcibly displaced by floods, wind-storms, earthquakes, droughts and other disasters.

    Many find refuge within their own country but some have to go abroad. In the context of climate change, such movements are likely to increase. National and international responses to this challenge are insufficient and protection for affected people remains inadequate.

  • Climate Change by the Numbers Climate Change by the Numbers
    You Just Need to Do the Math

    Nov 29, 2016 - Michio Kaku Explains, in this YouTube, why he Is no longer a Climate Change denier: Global Warming Is Real!.

  • An A.V That Gives a Real Buzz LISTEN: 58 Years Of Climate
    Change In One Minute

    Oct. 25, 2016  -Climate change is a gradual process, driven by invisible pollution. So it can be hard to wrap your brain around.

    But atmospheric scientists at the University of Washington have made it possible to listen to the planet changing.

  • CC & GW: Conservative Approach Republic EN - A Conservative
    Approach to Climate Change

    Policy Statement: Members of republicEn are conservatives, libertarians, and pragmatists of diverse political opinion. We stand together because we believe in American free enterprise. We believe that with a true level playing field, free enterprise can deliver the innovation to solve climate change. But America's climate policy needs to change. Change requires that conservative leaders step-up and lead.

  • Rising Seas and Your CityHow Will Rising
    Seas Affect Your City?

    Seas are rising, and cities throughout the world are responding to it differently.

    Read the article and view the map.


Professor Triggle's Climate Change Power Point
Easy to Understand Summation of Climate Change and What it Could Bring
Click Here

NOAA Sea-Level Rise Viewer

And if anyone should know about that, it's NOAH.
Use this web mapping tool to visualize community-level impacts from coastal flooding or sea level rise (up to 6 feet above average high tides). Photo simulations of how future flooding might impact local landmarks are also provided, as well as data related to water depth, connectivity, flood frequency, socio-economic vulnerability, wetland loss and migration, and mapping confidence. Click here to learn what else you need to know.

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What are the Causes and Consequences?


Description

Animal Consumption

An analysis of meat, egg, and milk production encompasses not only the direct rearing and slaughtering of animals, but also grain and fertilizer production for animal feed, waste storage and disposal, water use, and energy expenditures on farms and in transporting feed and finished animal products, among other key impacts of the production process as a whole.
  • It takes 2,500 gallons of water, 12 pounds of grain, 35 pounds of topsoil and the energy equivalent of one gallon of gasoline to produce one pound of feedlot beef
  • Because of over-consumption of fish, all 17 of the world’s major fishing areas have reached or exceeded their natural limits. One-third of the world’s fish catch is fed directly to livestock
  • 70% of US grain production is fed to livestock
  • 5 million acres of rainforest are felled every year in South and Central America alone to create cattle pasture
  • Roughly 20% of all currently threatened and endangered species in the US are harmed by livestock grazing
  • Animal agriculture is a chief contributor to water pollution. America’s farm animals produce 10 times the waste produced by the human population
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    Possible Solutions
    Consume less meat and dairy products, and focus on plants and grains. Call on government to end subsidies for meat production.
    See Resources for more information.

    Carbon Pollution

    Coal burning is responsible for nearly one-third of U.S. carbon emissions — the air pollution that is the main contributor to climate disruption. This according to the Sierra Club.


    Possible Solutions

    Make carbon more expensive to consume, by instituting a revenue-neutral carbon tax (but please don't call it a tax!). This would go a long way in making renewable energy competitive with cheap, dirty and unhealthy fossil fuels.
    See Resources for more information.

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    Concrete's Carbon Footprint

    According to the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (see Resources), ‘Concrete is the most widely used material on earth apart from water, with nearly three tons used annually for each man, woman, and child.
    Possible Solutions

    Come up with a concrete alternative. Do what the Romans do (resources).

    Deforestation

    Action for Our Plant (AFOP) describes the result of the decline of rainforests. Countries that are particularly poor try to grow their economies at the expense of this vital resource.
    Possible Solutions

    Incentivize these countries by rewarding them for protecting what are in reality, world resources.



    What not to do
    A better plan: See Resources.

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    Melting of the Polar Ice Caps


    The polar ice caps have melted faster in last 20 years than in the last 10,000. A comprehensive satellite study confirms that the melting ice caps are raising sea levels at an accelerating rate.

    See Sea Level Rise
    Possible Solutions

    Reduce the Greenhouse gas effect (GHGE), which traps CO2 and methane in the atmosphere by the use of fossil fuels, encouraging Green Building, smarter transportation and lower population. See Resources.

    Population Growth


    People around the world are beginning to address the problem by reducing their carbon footprint through less consumption and better technology. But unsustainable human population growth can overwhelm those efforts, leading us to conclude that we not only need smaller footprints, but fewer feet. -As reported by the Center for Biological Diversity.
    Possible Solutions

    This should be a no-brainer. Provide the tools and education for the poorest nations to reduce their birth rates. The Obama administration is already doing that, unlike his predecessor, who just said 'no' (See Resources). In the United States, women should be able to decide if and when to bear children. Religious leaders should not encourage motherhood when it's ill affordable.

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    Poor Regulation


    The nature of greenhouse gases, or GHGs, makes international cooperation a must if the world hopes to prevent and avoid the experts’ predictions of widespread negative environmental effects. Because each state only incurs a fraction of the total cost of its own emissions, as GHGs act on a global rather than regional scale, the emission of GHGs has created a tragedy of the commons: each state has an incentive to overuse, even though the optimal solution is for each and every state to limit its emissions.
    Possible Solutions

    Appeal to your elected representatives to protect the environment and not the polluters. The U.S. helped to create the Kyoto Protocol, but America never signed on to it. As a world leader, WE should be setting examples for the rest of the world to follow. We should discourage business from nations with poor environmental records, but we'd better straighten out first. Keep our protection agencies funded, something that Congress likes not to do. Resources

    Sea-Level Rise

    Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere will continue to increase unless the billions of tons of our annual emissions decrease substantially. Increased concentrations are expected to:
  • Increase Earth's average temperature
  • Influence the patterns and amounts of precipitation
  • Reduce ice and snow cover, as well as permafrost
  • Raise sea level
  • Increase the acidity of the oceans
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    Resources

    • Carbon Tax Center    • Take the Fun out of Funding

    • Here's the Beef
      • Food Choices & the Planet   

    • Do What the Romans Do       • Come Together - Right Now

    • Warming Oceans - Melting Ice
    •  Taxing What Hurts our Planet

    • GHGE - It's a Gas     • Just Say 'Maybe'

    Global Warming Denial Mythology

    1. Carbon dioxide "literally cannot cause global warming." People have tried to deny climate science in a lot of ways, but it's hard to beat a complete rejection of well-established atmospheric physics. Joe Bastardi, a meteorologist appearing on Fox News, argued that CO2 "literally" cannot cause warming because it doesn't "mix well in the atmosphere" (it does). He's also claimed that warming would violate the First Law of Thermodynamics, which states that energy can neither be created nor destroyed. (In fact, global warming has nothing to do with newly created energy, but with the atmosphere trapping energy that's already around.)
    2. "Snow skiing will be hurt – but water skiing will benefit." In 1990, as the world was beginning to grapple with the devastating predictions of climate models, a Yale economist set out to determine how much was a reasonable amount to spend on combating the problem. Not that much, he concluded, since "Humans thrive in a wide variety of climate zones. Cities are increasingly climate-proofed by technological changes like air-conditioning and shopping malls." Further, he argued, the hardest-hit sectors – like, say, agriculture – are relatively small parts of the economy anyway. And economic growth in other sectors could compensate: "Snow skiing will be hurt – but water skiing will benefit." How reassuring! The Fossil Fuel Resistance: Meet the New Green Heroes RS contributor Bill McKibben lambasted this analysis in his 2007 book, Deep Economy. "It's nice to have microelectronics; it's necessary to have lunch," wrote McKibben. "If global warming 'only' damages agriculture, the rest may not matter much."

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    3. "We must demand that more coal be burned to save the Earth from global cooling." The "global cooling" myth is another favorite of climate deniers, despite broad scientific consensus that the planet is in fact warming. But it's got to be an especially appealing fiction when you're the CEO of a coal company – this statement is from a tweet by Don Blankenship, then the head of Massey Energy.
    4. Climate change is impossible because "God's still up there." In 2012, U.S. Sen. James Inhofe (R-Oklahoma) contended that acceptance of climate science was at odds with Christianity – never mind that many Christian leaders and institutions take climate change very seriously. "My point is, God's still up there," he told Voice of Christian Youth America. "The arrogance of people to think that we, human beings, would be able to change what He is doing in the climate is to me outrageous." A close runner-up in this category: In 2009, Rep. John Shimkus (R-Illinois) cited God's post-flood promise to Noah as evidence we shouldn't be worried. "The Earth will end only when God declares it's time to be over," he declared. "Man will not destroy this Earth." Well, that must be nice to know.

    5. God buried fossil fuels "because he loves to see us find them." Bryan Fischer, a director at the American Family Association, compared efforts to burn less fossil fuels to telling a friend that you don't like their birthday present. "That's kind of how we're treating God when he's given us these gifts of abundant and inexpensive and effective fuel sources," he observed. "God has buried those treasures there because he loves to see us find them." And everyone knows it's bad manners to turn down a divine treasure hunt.
    6. "The President was wearing a trench coat it was so cold, but he's talking about global warming." This gem, from U.S. Rep. Steve Scalise (R-Louisiana) in reference to President Obama's 2013 inauguration speech, is part of a long, confused tradition: The conviction that anecdotally observed cold weather of any kind debunks the science of climate change. See also the igloo that James Inhofe's family built on the National Mall (they called it "Al Gore's new home") or the ad from the Virginia Republican Party, aired before the same snowstorm, advising voters to call legislators who supported climate actions and "tell them how much global warming you get this weekend. Maybe they'll come help you shovel." With probably thousands of articles out there now explaining the simple fact that weather is not the same thing as climate, this joke gets dumber every time it's made.

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    7. "I thought it must be true until I found out what it cost." Yes, Sen. Inhofe gets two entries. Speaking to Rachel Maddow in 2012, he admitted that his rejection of climate science began with realizing how expensive mitigation would be. Not only is it flatly nonsensical to deny that a problem exists because you don't like its cure, delaying climate action is actually the more expensive course. The International Energy Agency has estimated that for every year the world delays taking significant action to curb climate change, we'll end up paying an additional $500 billion later on.
    8. Safeguarding the climate is "a worldview that elevates the Earth above man." Rick Santorum was a front-runner for the GOP presidential nomination when he called climate science a "phony theology" – "a worldview that elevates the Earth above man and says that we can't take those resources because we're going to harm the Earth." (Santorum has also said, "We were put on this Earth as creatures of God to have dominion over the Earth, to use it wisely and steward it wisely, but for our benefit not for the Earth's benefit.") This people-vs.-planet idea is another common refrain from climate skeptics. They rarely seem to have considered the fairly obvious point that functioning human society depends on a healthy planet.
    9. "100 years is a long time . . . There is an extremely high chance that the very nature of human society itself will have changed by that time in ways that render this entire issue moot." This novel bit of reasoning is from an essay called "In Praise of Dirty Energy: There Are Worse Things Than Pollution and We Have Them," by economist and blogger Karl W. Smith, now a writer for Forbes. Smith accepts the science of climate change – but argues that we should burn more fossil fuels anyway, in order to spur economic growth. As the climate changes, he believes that people will simply build new cities or move north to Siberia, and build a society so technologically advanced it's somehow progressed beyond the need for a stable climate. Piece of cake!

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    10. "I have a theory about global warming and why people think it's real. Go back 30, 40 years when there was much less air conditioning in the country. When you didn't have air conditioning and you left the house, it may in fact have gotten a little cooler out there, because sometimes houses become hot boxes. Especially if you're on the second or third floor of a house in the summer time and all you've got is open windows and maybe a window fan. Or you have some servant standing there fanning you with a piece of paper. When you walked outside, no big deal, it's still hot as hell. Now, 30, 40 years later, all this air conditioning, and it's a huge difference when you go outside. When you go outside now, my golly, is it hot. Oh. Global warming. It's all about the baseline you're using for comparison."
    Oh, OK: All those scientists who have confirmed a pattern of long-term climate change were just getting confused by their air conditioning. Right. Thanks, Rush Limbaugh, for the low-hanging fruit.
    New Math: Commentary by Bill McKibben