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Page Updated: Feb. 18, 2020
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How Much Hotter
Is Your Town?
How Much Hotter Is Your
Hometown Than When You Were Born?

Aug. 31, 2018 -As the world warms because of human-induced climate change, most of us can expect to see more days when temperatures hit 90 degrees Fahrenheit (32 degrees Celsius) or higher. See how your hometown has changed so far and how much hotter it may get.

Click now to get your statistics
from The NY Times Climate Forward.


Documentaries to See
Watch These Documentaries
Over the Holidays

Dec. 18, 2019 -Don’t feel like watching that holiday movie you’ve already seen 900 times? Then gather ’round to learn about a topic even more timely than Christmas cookies and the dreidel song: our warming planet.

In addition to the best-known titles, like “An Inconvenient Truth” and its sequel, “Chasing Ice,” and Leonardo DiCaprio’s “Before the Flood” and “Ice on Fire,” here are five documentaries to try. Don’t worry about spoiling the holiday mood: Most of them end on an inspiring note.

Click now to see the whole list
from The NY Times Climate Forward.

• The Causes & Consequences?
• The Approaches
• Sea Level Rise Viewer
• Insights From Climate Science
or Why Wafflers are Wrong

• Easy to Understand Climate Change
Summation and What it Could Bring

Show it With Colors
Using Art to Reveal Climate Change

These Watercolor Paintings Actually Include Climate Change Data. Jill Pelto, an artist and scientist, incorporates graphs of rising sea levels and soaring temperatures in her artwork


Visit the Climate Museum
in New York City
A New Museum For the Path Ahead

Climate change is the defining challenge of our time. Only together can we rise to meet it.

The Climate Museum is catalyzing a cultural transformation around climate, inviting people from all walks of life into the conversation and building community around solutions. Transcending traditional disciplinary and societal boundaries, the Museum brings people together to learn about the problem, grieve what has been lost, actively engage with solutions, and join the fight for a brighter future.

To borrow the words of a Hurricane Irma survivor as she reflected on the Climate Museum’s first exhibition: “Never has this made more sense than now.”

Location: The Climate Museum
800 Third Ave, 18th Floor
New York, NY 10022


A Climate Crisis Haiku
A Climate Crisis Haiku

To read this beautiful short poem from Dan Dana, author of Everyday Peacemaking, and much much more, click here.





Of Possible Climate Change Interest

(Mouse over any link for the synopsis. Click for full details)

Causes and Consequences

Click on a subject for more information.

Meat Consumption CO2 Pollution Concrete's Footprint Deforestation
Ice Meltdown Poor Regulation Population Growth
Sea-Level Rise


Approaches

Click on a subject for more information.

  • The National Climate Change Assessment
    Explore Our Changing Climate

    Evidence for changes in Earth’s climate can be found from the top of the atmosphere to the depths of the oceans.

    Researchers from around the world have compiled this evidence using satellites, weather balloons, thermometers at surface stations, and many other types of observing systems that monitor the Earth’s weather and climate. The sum total of this evidence tells an unambiguous story: the planet is warming.

    Learn more from the
    National Climate Change Assessment

  • 6 Things We Can Do About Climate ChangeVideo Cam
    Watch the Video

    Learn the six thing we can do about Climate Change. The first three are choices you can make in your own life. And the second three will have an even bigger impact.

    Click to Watch the video from
    the Climate Reality Project.

  • Climate Change Positive Thoughts (free e-Book)
    Get Your Free e-Book

    You can help build a movement to fight back against fossil fuel interests and find commonsense solutions to the climate crisis.

    Learn more to download the
    e-Book from the Climate Reality Project

  • Get the Climate Lab Book
    View the Interesting Graphs

    View all kinds of interesting graphs showing how our climate has changed over the centuries.

    With the end of 2018, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) released their provisional State of the Climate report. The WMO asked whether Climate Lab Book could provide some updated graphics, also reproduced here.

    Click now for entire visualization.

  • Interactive Climate Map 2050 (CC Consequences)
    2050 Interactive Climate Map

    How will rising temperatures affect your community? We mapped what the world will look like under current climate change projections.

    Click now for maps showing how your area
    will be affected - from the Revelator.

  • The People's Dosier on Climate Change
    Science-Based Outlines

    The People’s Dossier on 1.5°C contains the stories of communities fighting against fossil fuel projects and for a fast and just transition to 100% renewable energy. It outlines how climate change is currently impacting them and grounds their fight in the latest climate science.

    Click now for more from 350.org.

  • Global Warming Report from NOAA
    NOAA Knows - And NOAA Should Know

    Use this web mapping tool to visualize community-level impacts from coastal flooding or sea level rise (up to 6 feet above average high tides.

    Click now for more from
    the NOAA section of this web page.

  • Another Good Global Warming Resource
    Good Old Greenhouse Warming

    The overwhelming majority of scientists agree that our globe is undergoing major climate change. They also agree that the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is rising significantly.

    Click now for more from greenhouse.

  • More Climate Change Resources
    More Climate Change Information

    If you still haven’t had enough, click here
    for that section of this web page.

  • NY Times Climate Forward: (Climate Change Q&A)
    The NY Times Delivers
    Climate Change Info

    1. What is Happening?

    2.What Could Happen?

    3. What Can We Do?

    Click here for that section of this web page.

  • Carbon Fee & Dividend Video
    How This Works

    Learn how Carbon Fee & Dividend works on your behalf, and not that of the fossil fuel industry.

    Click here for video from
    the Citizen's Climate Lobby.

  • Interactive Air Pollution Map 2100
    Projections for Pollution Increases

    Exclusive map shows where pollution is projected to increase, county by county, thanks to climate change.

    Click here for the map from the Revelator.

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Resources

Mouse over a topic for a brief description.
Click on it to learn much more

Come Together - Right Now
Warming Oceans - Melting Ice
Taxing What Hurts our Planet
Just Say 'Maybe'
GHGE - It's a Gas

NOAA Sea-Level Rise Viewer

And if anyone should know
about that, it's NOAH.

Use this web mapping tool to visualize community-level impacts from coastal flooding or sea level rise (up to 6 feet above average high tides). Photo simulations of how future flooding might impact local landmarks are also provided, as well as data related to water depth, connectivity, flood frequency, socio-economic vulnerability, wetland loss and migration, and mapping confidence.
Click here to learn what else you need to know.


 

What are the Causes and
Consequencesof Climate Change?

Description

 

Animal Consumption


An analysis of meat, egg, and milk production encompasses not only the direct rearing and slaughtering of animals, but also grain and fertilizer production for animal feed, waste storage and disposal, water use, and energy expenditures on farms and in transporting feed and finished animal products, among other key impacts of the production process as a whole.
It takes 2,500 gallons of water, 12 pounds of grain, 35 pounds of topsoil and the energy equivalent of one gallon of gasoline to produce one pound of feedlot beef.
Because of over-consumption of fish, all 17 of the world’s major fishing areas have reached or exceeded their natural limits. One-third of the world’s fish catch is fed directly to livestock
70% of US grain production is fed to livestock
5 million acres of rainforest are felled every year in South and Central America alone to create cattle pasture.
Roughly 20% of all currently threatened and endangered species in the US are harmed by livestock grazing.
Animal agriculture is a chief contributor to water pollution. America’s farm animals produce 10 times the waste produced by the human population.

 

Possible Solutions

Consume less meat and dairy products, and focus on plants and grains. Call on government to end subsidies for meat production.
See Resources for more information.

Carbon Pollution

Coal burning is responsible for nearly one-third of U.S. carbon emissions — the air pollution that is the main contributor to climate disruption. This according to the Sierra Club.

 

Possible Solutions

Make carbon more expensive to consume, by instituting a revenue-neutral carbon tax (but please don't call it a tax!). This would go a long way in making renewable energy competitive with cheap, dirty and unhealthy fossil fuels.
See Resources for more information.


Concrete's Carbon Footprint

According to the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (see Resources), ‘Concrete is the most widely used material on earth apart from water, with nearly three tons used annually for each man, woman, and child.

 

Possible Solutions


Come up with a concrete alternative. Do what the Romans do (resources).
 

Deforestation

Action for Our Plant (AFOP) describes the result of the decline of rainforests. Countries that are particularly poor try to grow their economies at the expense of this vital resource.

Possible Solutions


Incentivize these countries by rewarding them for protecting what are in reality, world resources.



What not to do
A better plan: See Resources.

Melting of the Polar Ice Caps


The polar ice caps have melted faster in last 20 years than in the last 10,000. A comprehensive satellite study confirms that the melting ice caps are raising sea levels at an accelerating rate.



Sea-Level Rise

Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere will continue to increase unless the billions of tons of our annual emissions decrease substantially.
Increased concentrations are expected to:
• Increase Earth's average temperature
• Influence the patterns and amounts of precipitation
• Reduce ice and snow cover, as well as permafrost
• Raise sea level
• Increase the acidity of the oceans
See Resources


Population Growth


People around the world are beginning to address the problem by reducing their carbon footprint through less consumption and better technology. But unsustainable human population growth can overwhelm those efforts, leading us to conclude that we not only need smaller footprints, but fewer feet. -As reported by the Center for Biological Diversity.

Possible Solutions


This should be a no-brainer. Provide the tools and education for the poorest nations to reduce their birth rates. The Obama administration is already doing that, unlike his predecessor, who just said 'no' (See Resources). In the United States, women should be able to decide if and when to bear children. Religious leaders should not encourage motherhood when it's ill affordable.


Poor Regulation


The nature of greenhouse gases, or GHGs, makes international cooperation a must if the world hopes to prevent and avoid the experts’ predictions of widespread negative environmental effects. Because each state only incurs a fraction of the total cost of its own emissions, as GHGs act on a global rather than regional scale, the emission of GHGs has created a tragedy of the commons: each state has an incentive to overuse, even though the optimal solution is for each and every state to limit its emissions.
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Possible Solutions


Appeal to your elected representatives to protect the environment and not the polluters. The U.S. helped to create the Kyoto Protocol, but America never signed on to it. As a world leader, WE should be setting examples for the rest of the world to follow. We should discourage business from nations with poor environmental records, but we'd better straighten out first. Keep our protection agencies funded, something that Congress likes not to do. Resources

Global Warming Denial Mythology


1. Carbon dioxide "literally cannot cause global warming." People have tried to deny climate science in a lot of ways, but it's hard to beat a complete rejection of well-established atmospheric physics. Joe Bastardi, a meteorologist appearing on Fox News, argued that CO2 "literally" cannot cause warming because it doesn't "mix well in the atmosphere" (it does). He's also claimed that warming would violate the First Law of Thermodynamics, which states that energy can neither be created nor destroyed. (In fact, global warming has nothing to do with newly created energy, but with the atmosphere trapping energy that's already around.)

2. "Snow skiing will be hurt – but water skiing will benefit."
In 1990, as the world was beginning to grapple with the devastating predictions of climate models, a Yale economist set out to determine how much was a reasonable amount to spend on combating the problem. Not that much, he concluded, since "Humans thrive in a wide variety of climate zones. Cities are increasingly climate-proofed by technological changes like air-conditioning and shopping malls." Further, he argued, the hardest-hit sectors – like, say, agriculture – are relatively small parts of the economy anyway. And economic growth in other sectors could compensate: "Snow skiing will be hurt – but water skiing will benefit." How reassuring!

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The Fossil Fuel Resistance:
Meet the New Green Heroes


RS contributor Bill McKibben lambasted this analysis in his 2007 book, Deep Economy. "It's nice to have microelectronics; it's necessary to have lunch," wrote McKibben. "If global warming 'only' damages agriculture, the rest may not matter much."

3. "We must demand that more coal be burned to save the Earth from global cooling." The "global cooling" myth is another favorite of climate deniers, despite broad scientific consensus that the planet is in fact warming. But it's got to be an especially appealing fiction when you're the CEO of a coal company – this statement is from a tweet by Don Blankenship, then the head of Massey Energy.

4. Climate change is impossible because "God's still up there." In 2012, U.S. Sen. James Inhofe (R-Oklahoma) contended that acceptance of climate science was at odds with Christianity – never mind that many Christian leaders and institutions take climate change very seriously. "My point is, God's still up there," he told Voice of Christian Youth America. "The arrogance of people to think that we, human beings, would be able to change what He is doing in the climate is to me outrageous." A close runner-up in this category: In 2009, Rep. John Shimkus (R-Illinois) cited God's post-flood promise to Noah as evidence we shouldn't be worried. "The Earth will end only when God declares it's time to be over," he declared. "Man will not destroy this Earth." Well, that must be nice to know.

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5. God buried fossil fuels "because he loves to see us find them." Bryan Fischer, a director at the American Family Association, compared efforts to burn less fossil fuels to telling a friend that you don't like their birthday present. "That's kind of how we're treating God when he's given us these gifts of abundant and inexpensive and effective fuel sources," he observed. "God has buried those treasures there because he loves to see us find them." And everyone knows it's bad manners to turn down a divine treasure hunt.

6. "The President was wearing a trench coat it was so cold, but he's talking about global warming." This gem, from U.S. Rep. Steve Scalise (R-Louisiana) in reference to President Obama's 2013 inauguration speech, is part of a long, confused tradition: The conviction that anecdotally observed cold weather of any kind debunks the science of climate change. See also the igloo that James Inhofe's family built on the National Mall (they called it "Al Gore's new home") or the ad from the Virginia Republican Party, aired before the same snowstorm, advising voters to call legislators who supported climate actions and "tell them how much global warming you get this weekend. Maybe they'll come help you shovel." With probably thousands of articles out there now explaining the simple fact that weather is not the same thing as climate, this joke gets dumber every time it's made.

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7. "I thought it must be true until I found out what it cost." Yes, Sen. Inhofe gets two entries. Speaking to Rachel Maddow in 2012, he admitted that his rejection of climate science began with realizing how expensive mitigation would be. Not only is it flatly nonsensical to deny that a problem exists because you don't like its cure, delaying climate action is actually the more expensive course. The International Energy Agency has estimated that for every year the world delays taking significant action to curb climate change, we'll end up paying an additional $500 billion later on.

8. Safeguarding the climate is "a worldview that elevates the Earth above man." Rick Santorum was a front-runner for the GOP presidential nomination when he called climate science a "phony theology" – "a worldview that elevates the Earth above man and says that we can't take those resources because we're going to harm the Earth." (Santorum has also said, "We were put on this Earth as creatures of God to have dominion over the Earth, to use it wisely and steward it wisely, but for our benefit not for the Earth's benefit.") This people-vs.-planet idea is another common refrain from climate skeptics. They rarely seem to have considered the fairly obvious point that functioning human society depends on a healthy planet.

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9. "100 years is a long time . . . There is an extremely high chance that the very nature of human society itself will have changed by that time in ways that render this entire issue moot." This novel bit of reasoning is from an essay called "In Praise of Dirty Energy: There Are Worse Things Than Pollution and We Have Them," by economist and blogger Karl W. Smith, now a writer for Forbes. Smith accepts the science of climate change – but argues that we should burn more fossil fuels anyway, in order to spur economic growth. As the climate changes, he believes that people will simply build new cities or move north to Siberia, and build a society so technologically advanced it's somehow progressed beyond the need for a stable climate. Piece of cake!
10. "I have a theory about global warming and why people think it's real. Go back 30, 40 years when there was much less air conditioning in the country. When you didn't have air conditioning and you left the house, it may in fact have gotten a little cooler out there, because sometimes houses become hot boxes. Especially if you're on the second or third floor of a house in the summer time and all you've got is open windows and maybe a window fan. Or you have some servant standing there fanning you with a piece of paper. When you walked outside, no big deal, it's still hot as hell. Now, 30, 40 years later, all this air conditioning, and it's a huge difference when you go outside. When you go outside now, my golly, is it hot. Oh. Global warming. It's all about the baseline you're using for comparison."

Oh, OK: All those scientists who have confirmed a pattern of long-term climate change were just getting confused by their air conditioning. Right. Thanks, Rush Limbaugh, for the low-hanging fruit.
New Math: Commentary by Bill McKibben

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