The World's Ten Most Threatened Species

Endangered Salmon
Wild Salmon

                
Ivory Billed WP
Ivory-Billed
Woodpecker
Armor
Leopard
Javan Rhino
Javan
Rhino
Bamboo Lemur
Greater
Bamboo Lemur
Northern Right Whale
Northern
Right Whale
    
                
Mountain Gorilla
Mountain
Gorilla
LeatherbackTurtle
Leatherback
Turtle
Siberian Tiger
Siberian
Tiger
Chinese Giant Salamander
Chinese Giant
Salamander
Hawaiian Monk Seals
Hawaain
Monk Seal
    

Endangered Species News (in Date Order) For the Past 4 Months

Click on any link for the full story.

  • • 26 Storey Pig Slaughtering Skyscraper
    One Million Pigs a Year Could Suffer the Consequences

    Guardian

    Nov. 25, 2021 -On the southern outskirts of Ezhou, a city in central China’s Hubei province, a giant apartment-style building overlooks the main road. But it is not for office workers or families. At 26 storeys it is by far the biggest single-building pig farm in the world, with a capacity to slaughter 1.2 million pigs a year.

    This is China’s answer to its insatiable demand for pork, the most popular animal protein in the country.

  • • When We Save Wildlife, What Happens?
    Answer: We Save Ourselves

    NWF

    Nov. 22,-More than 12,000 species of wildlife across the country are at heightened risk of disappearing. Facing shrinking habitats, climate change, disease and other threats, wildlife need our help.

    The bipartisan Recovering America’s Wildlife Act will prevent extinction and ensure the full diversity of wildlife thrive for future generations. This bill is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to invest in states, Tribes, and territories’ on-the-ground work to conserve and restore species through collaboration and innovation.

  • • How Countries Can Wean Off Ivory Trade
    The Example of Japan

    ZME Science

    Nov. 21, -In the 1980s, Japan was responsible for about a third of the global ivory trade. Now, although the country still possesses a significant ivory market, researchers say Japan is no longer a threat to elephant populations. So how can we build on this for other countries?

  • • US Approves Largest Dam Removal in History
    Goal: To Save Endangered Salmon

    Guardian

    Nov. 17, 2022 -A US agency seeking to restore habitat for endangered fish gave final approval on Thursday to decommission four dams straddling the California-Oregon border, the largest dam removal undertaking in US history.

    Dam removal is expected to improve the health of the Klamath River, the route that Chinook salmon and endangered coho salmon take from the Pacific Ocean to their upstream spawning grounds, and from where the young fish return to the sea.

  • • Smaller Horn Rhinos are Safer From Poachers
    They're Evolving to
    Avoid Being Poached

    ZME Science

    Nov. 1, 2022 -Rhinoceros horns seem to have become significantly shorter over the past 130 years, and poaching is likely to blame. Researchers have studied archive images of the animals and found the size of the horn, relative to its body length, has decreased over time, as has also happened to elephants and wild sheep.

  • • New Species of Endangered
    Whale Discovered in the Gulf of Mexico
    A Unique Find For Researchers

    NWF

    Nov. 1,-The Rice’s whale, as it’s been named, was announced as a new species by researchers just last year, in 2021. Their name comes from biologist Dale Rice, who first realized the whales were present in the Gulf.

    Originally thought to be a rare baleen whale called a Bryde’s (pronounced Broo-dus) whale, Rice’s whales are genetically and physically different. Even their calls are distinct!

  • • The Needed Protection for Emperor Penguins
    These Creatures Face Threats of Melting Sea Ice

    NYT

    Oct. 25, 2022 -Emperor penguins have been listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act because the animals’ sea ice habitat is shrinking, federal officials announced Tuesday. Experts predict that 99 percent of the world’s emperor penguin population will disappear by 2100 without significantly reducing carbon pollution.

    The Antarctic sea ice, where the penguins spend much of the year, is under distress. Heat-trapping gases released by humans’ use of fossil fuels is causing the ice to disappear and break apart. That ice is essential to the animals’ livelihood.

  • • What Happens if Modern
    Large Mammals Become Extinct?
    Those Are Not the Only Animals We Need to Worry About

    ZME Science

    Oct. 15, 2022 -Currently, many large-bodied mammals are endangered. By examining past evidence about large mammal extinctions, a team of researchers led by the University of New Mexico (UNM) has analyzed the potentially profound impacts of losing animals such as elephants, rhinoceros, or lions – known in the scientific community as “megafauna” – on the ecosystems in which they are embedded.

    “Humans are having drastic effects on large mammals, both directly, such as hunting, and indirectly through land use and climate change,” said Sam Scheiner, a program director in the National Science Foundation’s Division of Environmental Biology. “This study shows that these effects can have profound impacts on ecosystems.”

  • • Earth's Animals Have Been
    in Trouble for the Past 50 Years
    The Number of Vertebrate Animals on the Planet Fell By Nearly 70%

    ZME Science

    Oct. 13, 2022 -Wild populations of a sizeable number of animals have plunged by an average of 69% in the past half-century, according to a new study by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), as humans continue to pollute on an industrial scale, clear forests and consume beyond the limits of the planet. This year’s assessment’s conclusion is its most alarming yet, the WWF said.

    The report covers only vertebrates (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish) and excludes plants or animals without spines.

  • • Sea Turtles Return! Restoring Habitat in the Gulf
    Louisiana, Florida Projects Creating Better Future For Sea Turtles

    NWF, Oct. 11, 2022 -On a stretch of sandy beach off of Louisiana’s coast, something remarkable has happened – the sea turtles are back! For the first time in 75 years, sea turtle nests and hatchlings have been seen on Louisiana’s Chandeleur Islands in the Breton National Wildlife Refuge.

    The hatchlings on these barrier islands were Kemp’s ridley turtles, the world’s smallest sea turtle, which is also an endangered species. Kemp’s ridleys nest almost exclusively along beaches in the Gulf of Mexico, but no nests have been documented on the Chandeleur Islands since 1947.

  • • Once Devastated, These Pacific Reefs
    Have Seen an Amazing Rebirth
    Protected Corals Around the Southern Line Islands Have Speedily Recovered From the Heat of the 2015-2016 El Niño

    NatGeo

    Oct. 11, 2022 -The most astonishing and heartening coral rebirth the world has ever seen came to light recently.

    To understand how it happened, you have to go back to April 2009.

  • • The Spate of Whale Deaths in Argentina
    Micro Algae Could Be to Blame

    ZME Science

    Oct. 6, 2022 -The Valdés Peninsula, in Argentina’s Chubut province, is the largest sanctuary for the southern right whale (Eubalaena australis) in South America. Between April and December, hundreds of this species (which a century ago was on the verge of extinction due to commercial whaling) gather to mate and give birth in the calm, warm waters of the gulf around the peninsula.

    But this year, there’s a problem.

  • • Saving Whales From Ship Collisions
    Scientists Hope New Technology Will Drive the Number to Zero

    NYT

    Sep. 21, 2022 -Fran washed ashore in August, some 25 miles south of the Golden Gate Bridge. The beloved and much-photographed female humpback whale had a broken neck, most likely the result of being hit by a ship.

    This latest instance of oceanic roadkill increased the tally of whales killed by ships near San Francisco this year to four. The true death toll is likely to be much higher as whale carcasses often sink to the sea floor.

  • • 3 Manatees Return to Florida After Completing
    Rehabilitation at Columbus Zoo and Aquarium
    Thank You, Columbus Zoo

    DAYTON24/7NOW, Sep. 18, 2022 -Three manatees, Scampi, Acorn, and Einstein have arrived in Central Florida after completing their rehabilitation at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium.

    These manatees were all rescued off the coast of Florida and have completed multiple rehabilitation milestones before being released back into the wild.

  • • After 75 Years, Cheetahs Return to India
    Can a Predator Population Be Restored in a Place Where it was Hunted into Extinction?

    NYT

    Sep. 16, 2022 -Cheetahs once prowled India among lions, tigers and leopards. They appear in ancient Hindu texts and in cave paintings, and are woven into centuries-old tapestries. The Mughal emperor Akbar kept 1,000 cheetahs in his stables.

    But for 75 years — the entirety of its existence as an independent nation — India has been bereft of cheetahs, the world’s fastest land animal.

  • • Group Seeks Endangered Species
    Protection For West Coast Bull Kelp
    It's Critical to Oregon Coastal Ecosystems that Historically Supported Sea Otters, Urchins and Sunflower Sea Stars

    OPB

    Sep. 5, 2022 -An environmental group is seeking Endangered Species Act protections for underwater forests of bull kelp along the West Coast.

    The Center for Biological Diversity on Thursday submitted a petition to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to grant endangered status to the long stalks of kelp that are critical to Oregon coastal ecosystems.

  • • Delegates Come Close, But Fail
    Again to Clinch High Seas Protection Treaty
    Delegates From Around the World Failed to Reach Consensus On a High-Stakes, Legally Binding Treaty to Conserve Biodiversity On the High Seas.

    MB News

    Aug. 29, 2022 - U.N. member states came tantalizingly close to sealing a deal for a high-stakes, legally binding treaty to conserve biodiversity on the high seas, areas beyond national jurisdiction that comprise two-thirds of the global ocean. At the close of negotiations on Aug. 26 in New York, however, delegates had failed to net consensus. Top sticking points included fair access to marine resources for all and how to establish marine protected areas.

    The meeting of 168 U.N. member states ended with a commitment to reconvene before the year is over.

  • • Dugongs, Beloved Vegetarian
    'Mermaids,' Declared Extinct Near China
    The Gentle Marine Mammal Hasn't
    Been Seen For Over Twenty Years

    GIZMODO

    Aug. 24, 2022 -Pour one out for the dugong today—the bulbous yet endearing undersea mammal has hit a worrying new benchmark of species decline. Scientists have declared the animal “functionally extinct” in part of the South China Sea, in a study published in the journal Royal Society Open Science. Hunting, the fishing industry, aquaculture, and other human activity that’s degraded the seagrass habitat is to blame, according to the researchers.

  • • Killing of Ranger Protecting Rhinos
    Raises Fears for Conservation Efforts
    It Has Stoked Concerns that
    Organized Poaching Syndicates
    are Targeting Wildlife Protectors

    NYT

    Aug. 16, 2022, -Anton Mzimba, the lead ranger at a reserve in South Africa, had received multiple death threats. But he tried not to let the warnings of danger get to him, reminding himself that by protecting rhinos he was working for the greater good, according to an interview he gave last year.

    Africa’s close-knit conservation community has been reeling since Mr. Mzimba was gunned down in front of his family at home on July 26.

  • • Southern California’s Signature River Under Threat
    Utom, or Santa Clara River, Features More Than 110 Special-Status Species

    Sierra Sun Times, Aug. 14, 2022, -A new report published last week called on decision-makers in Ventura and Los Angeles counties to apply sustainable water-management practices to the Santa Clara River, known as Utom to the Chumash people.

    Released by the Center for Biological Diversity, the State of Utom 2022 identifies the main threats to, and conservation goals for, the 116-mile river that stretches from the Angeles National Forest in Los Angeles County to the Pacific Ocean in Ventura County. It’s the largest watershed in Southern California and home to more than 110 special-status animals and plants. The river is under threat of development, water diversions and other harmful practices that could decimate the habitat of fish like the unarmored threespine stickleback, California red-legged frogs, and other sensitive species.

  • • Tokitae the Performing Orca Can Finally Go Home
    This Follows a
    Half Century in Captivity

    The Guardian

    Aug. 13, 2022 -Five decades ago, a group of men rounded up more than 80 orcas in a cove on Whidbey Island off Washington state. Using boats, explosives, nets and sticks, they separated young orca calves from their mothers. Locals were haunted by the whales’ human-like cries, according to an account of the day.

  • • Loss of Crocodilians May
    Have Devastating Consequences
    They Have Played
    a Vital Ecological Role

    EarhDotCom

    Aug. 6, 2022, -Over half of the world’s crocodilians – a group that includes crocodiles, alligators, caimans, and gharials – are currently threatened with extinction due to habitat loss, hunting, bycatch in fishing gear, and damming of rivers. A new study led by the University of Oxford in collaboration with the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) has found that losing these endangered species entails losing the diverse ecological roles that they provide, with unknown – and potentially devastating – ecological consequences. According to the experts, about 38 percent of the various ecological functions that crocodilian species provide for wider ecosystems are now at risk of being lost.

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Resources

  • Amboseli Trust for Elephants
    Conservation Through
    Knowledge And Awareness

    The Amboseli Trust for Elephants aims to ensure the long-term conservation and welfare of Africa’s elephants in the context of human needs and pressures through scientific research, training, community outreach, public awareness and advocacy.

  • Aspinall Foundation for Animal Conservation
       The Aspinall Foundation   

    An international Animal Conservation Charity in Conjunction with Howletts and Port Lympne Wild Animal Parks.

    Mission: to halt extinction of rare and endangered species and return them to the wild where possible.

  • Cheetah Conservation Fund
    Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF):

    It's the longest-running and most successful conservation project dedicated to cheetah survival.

    Their signature programs, addressing human-wildlife conflict, livelihood development, education and habitat restoration, have stabilized the wild cheetah population of Namibia – the world’s largest — and have helped launch sister programs in several other cheetah range countries. None of this would not be possible without you.

  • Creatures of the Photo Ark
    Nat Geo Photographer
    Shows His Stuff

    Joel Sartore has traveled the world for more than 25 years, photographing subjects from tiny to terrifying.

    These images are not to be missed.

  • The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust
    The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

    Born from one family’s passion for Kenya and its wilderness, the Trust is today the most successful orphan-elephant rescue and rehabilitation program in the world and one of the pioneering conservation organizations for wildlife and habitat protection in East Africa.

  • Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund
    Their Mission

    The Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International is dedicated to the conservation, protection and study of gorillas and their habitats in Africa. Our successful, integrated approach includes close collaboration with local governments and communities as well as partners from around the world

  • Endangered Arkive International Charity
    Arkive of Endangered Species

    Explore 15,000 of the world’s endangered species. With over 100,000 photos and videos, discover what these animals, plants and fungi look like, what makes them special and why we should protect them.

  • Evolutionarily Distinct &Globally Endangered
    Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered (EDGE)

    The EDGE of Existence program is the only global conservation initiative to focus specifically on threatened species that represent a significant amount of unique evolutionary history.

Arkive LogoEndangered Species Coalition Logo

IUCN Logo   Durrel Trust
  • Extinction Countdown
    Endangered Species News and
    Research Around the World

    See article upon article covering threats to the endangered natural world.

    Click now for the
    Scientific American pages.
  • Florida Fish & Wildlife Cons. Commission
    A State Commission
    to Protect Wildlife

    Set up to address fish & wildlife, hunting and game mamagement, fisheries, law enforcement, habitat ans species conservation and more.

  • Gift the Center for Bio-Diversity
    Show Your Love For Wild-
    life With A Gift Today

    We're counting on the commitment of our members to help our fight to uphold the Endangered Species Act and defend the wild plants, animals and places we all love.

    The Endangered Species Act has an unmatched record of success and has put hundreds of species on the path to recovery, but countless plants and animals are still clinging to existence. Their futures depend on the Center for Biological Diversity and the strength of the Endangered Species Act, and we depend on you.

  • My Green World
    Game Playing to Proterct Wildlife

    World of the Wild is a unique game that gives users an opportunity to participate in fun gameplay while contributing to real life wildlife conservation efforts. This app gamifies the concept of saving animals and allows you to rescue, rehabilitate and care for animals and habitats within your own carefully crafted world. Each animal in the app represents a real-life charity!

    Partnered with 18 charities, World of the Wild offers unique facts and pop quizzes and will allow users to rescue animals in need! The game will empower the global community and transform online culture while restoring the natural world. It's a change to the status quo; utilising online activism to achieve tangible results in conservation.

    Click now to start your game going.

  • The National Wildlife Property Repository
    The National Wildlife
    Property Repository

    The (NWPR) is a 22,000 square foot office and warehouse located northeast of Denver, Colorado at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge. The facility is responsible for receiving wildlife items that have been forfeited or abandoned to the U.S.Fish and Wildlife Service.

    By law, these items are stored in a secure environment, many of which are donated to educational facilities, nonprofit organizations, and conservation agencies to aid in teaching about endangered species and other wildlife.

  • The Nature Conservancy
       The Nature Conservancy   

    Learn about the earth's species and how they are endangered.

    Planet Earth teems with life. And now you can meet some of its stars!

  • Redlist of Threatened Species
    The IUCN Red List is a critical indicator of the health of the world’s biodiversity

    Established in 1964, the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List of Threatened Species has evolved to become the world’s most comprehensive information source on the global extinction risk status of animal, fungus and plant species.

  • Save Our Environment Action Alert!
    SAVE OUR ENVIRONMENT.ORG
    It's a National Coalition
    for the Environment

    Humans are generating climate-altering greenhouse gases at a rate that will forever alter our world’s ecosystem...

  • Wildlife Conservation Society
    Global Wildlife Conservation

    There Statement: “It’s very simple: We cannot condone the dilution of the role of science in protecting endangered and threatened wildlife,” said WCS President and CEO Cristián Samper.

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Of Possible Interest

 

  • • Durrell Wildlife Trust
    The Many Ways They Defend Species

    An organization fully dedicated to the preservation of species. Their website contains many stories, videos and images to get their message across.

  • • Swans: Get the Lead Out
    Search And Rescue For
    Lead-Poisoned Swans

    Feb. 3, 2017,- When Martha Jordan arrived on scene, an elegant white bird with a black beak, a symbol of grace and beauty, lay draped across the tall grass at the edge of a lake. Jordan trudged through the marsh, scooped up its emaciated, 10-pound body and cradled the dead bird in her arms.

  • • Big Trouble For Koalas
    They May Be Extinct
    in Australia's New South
    Wales by 2050

    June 30, 2020,(NBC NEWS)-Koalas in the Australian state of New South Wales (NSW) could become extinct by 2050 unless the government immediately intervenes to protect them and their habitat, a parliamentary inquiry determined after a year-long inquiry.

    Land clearing for agriculture, urban development, mining and forestry had been the biggest factor in the fragmentation and loss of habitat for the animals in NSW, the country’s most populous state, over several decades.

  • • Lions Have Their Own Day
    Main Cause for Mane Claws

    August 11, 2017 - Today is World Lion Day, and we can't think of a better way to spend it than raising critically needed funds for research-driven, field-tested strategies that will help save one of the most awe-inspiring species on Earth.

  • • Do Right by the Right Whale
    Protect North Atlantic Right
    Whales from Deadly Entanglements

    -North Atlantic right whales could be extinct in the wild by 2040 -- and the two leading reasons for human-caused North Atlantic right whale deaths are ship strikes and entanglement in fishing gear.

    The US government has lowered permitted vessel speeds to reduce ship strikes. But to save these whales we have to prevent deadly fishing entanglements too.

    Click now to sign this petition.

  • • Protecting Critical Habitat
    Critical Habitat is Key to the Survival of Endangered Species

    Jan. 22, 2022, (Center for Biological Diversity) -One of the Endangered Species Act’s strongest provisions, designation of “critical habitat” is required for all domestic species listed under the Act. Critical habitat includes specific areas within a species’ current range that have “physical or biological features essential to the conservation of the species,” as well as areas outside the species’ current range upon a determination “that such areas are essential for the conservation of the species.”

    In other words, the original definition of critical habitat said it must include all areas deemed important to a species’ survival or recovery, whether the species currently resides in those areas, historically resided in those areas, uses those areas for movement, or needs them for any other reason.

  • • International Polar Bear Day
    International Polar Bear Day
    Celebrated Annually on Feb. 27th

    Sea ice loss from human-caused climate warming is the single biggest threat to polar bears.

    Polar bears rely on sea ice to hunt seals, breed, and sometimes den. We could see dramatic declines in polar bear numbers by mid-century if we do not greatly reduce the use of fossil fuels for our energy needs, and instead shift to renewables.

    We invite you to join us in electing leaders who support a rapid transition from fossil fuels—making renewable energy options the easy, and affordable, choice across communities.

  • • The Species We Lost in 2020
    They May No Longer Exist Due To
    Humanity’s Destructive Effects On The Plane

    Jan. 6, 2021 (The Revelator) -A few months ago a group of scientists warned about the rise of extinction denial, an effort much like climate denial to mischaracterize the extinction crisis and suggest that human activity isn’t really having a damaging effect on ecosystems and the whole planet.

    That damaging effect is, in reality, impossible to deny.

  • • The Species We Lost in 2019
    Pesticides Are Killing Off
    the Andean Condor

    Jan. 6, 2020 (The Revelator)— We lost a lot of species in 2019.

    The year started with the extinction of a tiny Hawaiian snail and ended with the loss of one of the world’s largest freshwater fishes.

    Along the way we also said goodbye to three bird species, a shark, two frogs, several plants, and a whole lot more.

  • • World Penguin Awareness Day
    A Day Set Aside to
    Honor these Wonderful Birds

    Jan. 6, 2021(DaysoftheYear)-Penguins are fun and interesting animals that are unique in many different ways. There are currently over 18 different known species of penguin and some of them have been around the planet for well over 65 million years. They’re a beloved animal thanks to many popular depictions in movies and children’s stories, but they’re also fascinating birds that have piqued the interest of many people all over the world.

  • • The Endangered Sumatran Rhino
    How to Restore Them

    With fewer than 80 Sumatran Rhinos left in the world, restoring their population is of utmost importance. That’s why Global Wildlife is part of the Sumatran Rhino Survival Alliance, a groundbreaking strategic partnership that focuses on conservation breeding. The group is led by the International Rhino Foundation, International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Species Survival Commission (IUCN SSC), National Geographic Society, GWC and WWF.

    The Alliance has launched a new project called Sumatran Rhino Rescue. The effort, established to support the government of Indonesia’s national Sumatran Rhino breeding program, brings together previously disparate voices and organizations around a single plan to save the species. This ambitious effort includes:

    Click now to view the list of proposals.

  • • Where Have All the Insects Gone?
    Populations of Species Worldwide
    are Falling at Alarming Rate

    April, 2021, (National Geographic)-The extinction of the one-inch-wide Xerces blue butterfly, last seen in the dunes around San Francisco nearly 80 years ago, may have been a harbinger of what some scientists fear could become a global insect die-off.

  • • Saving Wolves - Ethical or Unethical?
    The Ethics of Saving Wolves

    July 11, 2018 -What is it about wolves that drive so much passion — either to conserve them and rebuild their populations or, on the opposite end of the spectrum, to hunt them or even remove them from the wild?

    Answering that question gets to the heart of what it means to be human and what wolves mean to people, says Michael P. Nelson, professor of environmental ethics and philosophy at Oregon State University.

  • • Saving The Southern Resident Orca
    AKA: Puget Sound Killer Whale

    (Center for Biological Diversity) -The The charismatic killer whale, or orca, is the totem species of northwest Washington and coastal British Columbia.

    This intelligent, social predator is known to form lasting social bonds and lives in highly organized pods where everyone cares for the young, sick or injured. But like all endangered species, those pods must learn how to navigate the complicated, dangerous terrain of the 21st century.

    As few as 72 Southern Residents remain on Earth. They’re in a dangerous decline because of a lack of food, pollution, and noise and disturbance from boats.

  • • Solomon Islands Coral Reef Under Stress
    Watch the Short Video

    June 4, 2021 (Wildlife Conservation Society), -Coral reefs are in crisis. These crucial undersea ecosystems have been battered in recent years, especially by climate change. The gravity of the situation is real: Over 20% of the world’s coral reefs have vanished in the last 30 years.

    Even reefs in shallow areas, previously thought less vulnerable, are showing alarming signs of climate-related stress. Tour a reef in the South Pacific that just underwent a major bleaching event—and be a witness to the urgency of climate action now.

  • • The Giraffe Population is Facing Extinction
    Saving the Giraffes

    Center for BioDiversity -Known for their 6-foot-long necks, distinctive patterning and long eyelashes, giraffes have always captured the human imagination. These amazing African animals have the highest blood pressure among land mammals, special valves in their heads to make sure they don't pass out after leaning over to drink water, and tongues that can be 20 inches long.

    But these tallest of all land mammals are in the midst of a silent extinction. Africa's giraffe population has dropped by almost 40 percent in the past 30 years, dwindling to just more than 97,000 individuals — which may seem like a big number, but not in giraffes' case (just consider their huge range, for instance).

  • • The Risk of Vanishing Freshwater Mussels
    America’s Freshwater Mussels
    Are Going Extinct
    — Here’s Why That Sucks

    The Revelator, Apr. 4 2018 -Unfortunately, despite the service they provide to our rivers and streams, North America’s freshwater mussels now need some conservation muscle.

    Pretty much wherever they’re found, the shelled bivalves are disappearing. Many of the 300-plus mussel species in the United States have already been added to the endangered species list; many more are waiting for similar protection. Beautiful species with crazy names like the orangefoot pimpleback, purple bean, Higgins eye pearlymussel and pink mucket could soon be a thing of the past.

  • • On Deck: Endangered Species Playing Cards
    Extinction in a Handful of Cards

    As reviewer John Platt wandered the aisles of Rose City Comic-Con in Portland in September (2018), his eyes kept taking in images of the dying and the deceased. Many of the attending artists, I found, were selling artwork and prints of endangered or extinct species. This included plenty of images of dinosaurs — you’d expect that from such an imaginative crowd — but also a fair share of tigers, rhinos, orangutans and polar bears.

    And then there was one of the most unusual items I found at this year’s convention: a tiny pack of playing cards devoted to extinction. Called simply “The 6th Extinction,” it’s like any normal deck of cards — except that in addition to your traditional hearts and clubs, each card also contains a painting or drawing of a species that has been lost due to human activity.

  • • What Is Causing the Amphibian Apocalypse?
    Amphibian 'Apocalypse' Caused By Most Destructive Pathogen Ever

    National Geographic, Mar. 28, 2019  - FOR DECADES, A silent killer has slaughtered frogs and salamanders around the world by eating their skins alive. Now, a global team of 41 scientists has announced that the pathogen—which humans unwittingly spread around the world—has damaged global biodiversity more than any other disease ever recorded.

    The new study, published in Science, is the first comprehensive tally of the damage done by the chytrid fungi Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal). In all, the fungi have driven the declines of at least 501 amphibian species, or about one out of every 16 known to science.

  • • Have a Problem With Giraffe Parts Sold in the U.S.?
    Giraffe Parts Sales Are Booming
    in the U.S., and It’s Legal

    Aug. 23, 2018 -An investigation showed imports made into pillows, boots and other items have become increasingly popular, at a time when the animal’s global population is dwindling.

    According to a report to be released Thursday by Humane Society of the United States and its international affiliate, more than 40,000 giraffe parts were imported to the United States from 2006 to 2015 to be made into expensive pillows, boots, knife handles, bible covers and other trinkets.

    Click now for more
    from the New York Times.

  • • Managing Conflicts With Lynx, Bobcats and Cougars
    Preventing and Managing ConflictsM
    With Lynx, Bobcats and Cougars

     (Province of Ontario)- Includes advice on the following:
    1. encountering a cougar or lynx
    2. make a property uninviting
    3. avoid conflicts
    4. protecting livestock
    5. humane lethal action

  • • Bringing Back the ‘Most Endangered Bird’ in the U.S.
    Three Years After Being Described
    as Nearly Extinct, the Florida
    Grasshopper Sparrow Soars Again.

    Jan. 25, 2021, (National Geographic)-Ashleigh Blackford has seen her share of dramatic bird releases over the years. She vividly recalls California condors soaring high into the sky and San Clemente loggerhead shrikes fluttering free.

    The tiny Florida grasshopper sparrow, on the other hand, merely hopped out of an open screen and skittered along the ground, says Blackford, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist.

  • • Coral Reef Restoration Demonstration Breakthrough
    Coral Reefs Account for a Large
    Portion of the World's Fisheries

    Feb. 16, 2022, (The Atlantic)-Dr. David Vaughan is working to combat the crisis in the world’s coral reefs—that is, that humans have lost 25 to 40 percent of the world’s corals in recent decades due largely to seawater temperature rise and ocean acidification. Vaughan has developed a game-changing technique called “microfragmenting” that allows corals to grow more than 25 times faster than normal, which could rapidly restore the dwindling population of healthy coral reefs. The Atlantic visited Dr. Vaughan in the Florida Keys to uncover how the process works and understand how much hope there is to revitalize our reefs.

  • • UN Says the Great Barrier Reef Be Listed 'in Danger'
    Australia is Irked by the Notion

    June 22 , 2021 (REUTERS) -The Great Barrier Reef should be added to a list of World Heritage Sites that are “in danger”, a United Nations panel said on Tuesday, drawing an angry response from Australia, which called the recommendation politically motivated.

    Australia has lobbied furiously for years to stay off the endangered list as it could lead to the world’s biggest coral reef ecosystem losing the U.N. heritage status, taking some of the shine off its attraction for tourists.

 

  • • Earth-Friendly Diet
    Eat Less Meat: Save More Wildlife

    Meat production is one of the main drivers of environmental degradation globally, and the crisis is rapidly growing worse.

    That’s why the Center for Biological Diversity launched their Earth-friendly Diet campaign.

  • • Bluefin Tuna Danger
    Atlantic Bluefin Tuna Are In Trouble

    This largest of tuna and can live up to 40 years. They migrate across oceans and can dive more than 4,000 feet...

    Click now for more and
    to watch a video.

  • • The Last of Their Kind
    Eight Species On Life Support

    Oct. 3, 2016 - Other than the remote hope of cloning extinct animals, ponderings about extinct creatures are reserved for the imagination. Extinction is the reason we should cherish the creatures that still roam the planet, the ones we still have a chance to experience. This is especially true when it comes to creatures teetering on the brink of extinction.

    Click now for a glimpse
    (while you still can).

  • • Polar Bears International
    Polar Bears International -
    Yes, They Have Their Own Group

    Their mission is to conserve polar bears and the sea ice they depend on. We also work to inspire people to care about the Arctic and its connection to our global climate.

  • • The Swift Fox is In Trouble
    Swift Fox May Not Be
    Swift Enough to Avoid Extinction

    - Although historically common and widely distributed in short- and mixed-grass prairies of the Great Plains, swift foxes have experienced significant population declines and are now estimated to occupy less than half of their historic range in the United States. In the face of this enormous decline, a multi-stakeholder, comprehensive approach is required to restore swift fox populations across the Northern Great Plains and beyond. Collaboration among tribal communities, universities, conservation organizations, state and government agencies, and private landowners is essential for the swift fox to make a viable comeback.

    Click now for the news
    from World Wildlife Federation.

  • • East Africa's Coral Refuge
    A Rare Ocean "Cool
    Spot" in the Pemba Channel

    Sep. 23, 2021, (Wildlife Conservation Society)-n 2020, scientists highlighted a gem in the waters off the coast of Kenya and Tanzania -- a deep channel of cool water, where threatened species of corals, sharks, and dolphins still thrive despite accelerating climate change. An underwater trove of biodiversity formed by glaciers receding from the slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro thousands of years ago, this marine area is a rare refuge for the species that call it home and the coastal communities who have relied on its waters for food and livelihoods for generations.

    This is the story of East Africa's Coral Refuge: how it was formed, the people and wildlife whose lives are inextricably tied to it, and a call to protect it amid a warming and developing world (with video, photos and map.

  • • Take The Arctic Wildlife Quiz
    How Much Do You
    Know About Arctic Wildlife?

    Sponsored by the National Wildlife Federation (NWF), see how much you actually know.

  • • World Penguin Day - Who Knew?
    Penguin Facts You Might Want to Know

    Apr. 25, 2021 (ZME Science), -World Penguin Day is upon us. Pioneered at McMurdo Station — an American Research center on Ross Island in Antarctica — to raise awareness and inform the public more about the plights of flightless birds, it has been embraced by environmentalists all over the globe. It was noticed by scientists that April 25 was the specific day which the Adelie penguins began to make their trip north for food during the wintertime, so that was the day that got the devotion.

    While popular belief is that all penguin species live in Antarctica, in fact, only five have ever visited, and only two (the Adelie and emperor) call it home 24/7. The Humboldt of Chile and Peru live on the shores of the Atacama Desert, the driest desert in the world where temperatures can reach around 70°F (21°C). The yellow-eyed penguins of Enderby Island off New Zealand burrow under the trees of the dwarf rata forests.

    Click now to read or listen to the story.
  • • Fla. Endangered Species Slideshow
    Endangered Panther Slide Show

    From Sierra Club - presented by Associated Organizing Representative, Aexis Meyer, MSc -This slideshow is being presented by Ms Meyer at various Sierra Club venues thorouhgout the country. It keys in on why we need to protect panthers and other endangered animals.

  • • The Dangers of Wildlife Trafficking
    10 Things Everyone Needs to Know

    Sep. 10, 2020 (The Revelator) -These crimes threaten tens of thousands of species around the world, causing extinctions, hurting people and spreading disease.

    In August 2020 federal authorities charged a dozen people for illegally trafficking millions of dollars of shark fins in Florida and two other states over the previous seven years.

  • • Last 100 Years of Animal Extinction
    Every Extinct Animal Since 1916

    Click now for the images
    and the story behind them.

  • • Gray Wales Are Dying Off in the Pacific
    The Gray Whale Population
    Plummeted by Nearly a
    Quarter Between 2016 and 2020

    Apr. 13, 2021, (National Geographic)-Over the last three years, Fishermen have noticed ominous changes. The whales are arriving in the estuary later in the year, and many appear malnourished, the jagged outline of vertebrae visible on their typically fatty backs. More whales than usual have been washing up dead along the shore.

  • • The Vital Species We Can't Afford to Lose
    The Vital Species We Can't Afford to Lose

    Mar. 10, 2020 (Deutsche Welle) - Every species on Earth plays an important role. But when it comes to sustaining life on our planet, some are more important than others. On World Wildlife Day, DW takes a look at some of those we can't afford to lose. Here is a list:

    1.Bees, 2. Ants, 3. Fungi, 4. Phytoplankton, 5. Bats, 6. Earthworms, 7. Primates and 8. Coral

    Click now to learn why.

  • • Baby Bees Are Suffering From Brain Damage
    Pesticides are Causing ‘Permanent and Irreversible’ Damage

    (Science Focus), -March. 4, 2020, The pesticide imidacloprid causes baby bumblebees’ brains to develop abnormally. When the larvae ate food contaminated with the pesticide, a key area of their brains underdeveloped. The bees’ ability to learn was impaired as a result, and the effects lasted for their whole lives.

    Baby bumblebees develop abnormally when exposed to food contaminated with a certain type of pesticide, scientists have found.

    Researchers from the Imperial College London scanned the brains of bees exposed to imidacloprid, an insecticide with a similar chemical composition to nicotine. They found the key region of the brain that facilitates learning showed reduced growth in the insects exposed to imidacloprid.

  • • Petition to Help Humpback Whales to Survive
    New Hope for
    Humpbacks' Ocean Home

    Dec. 1, 2019  (Center for Biological Diversity)-Each spring humpback whales migrate hundreds and thousands of miles to feed in U.S. waters. Fish are flying. Birds are swooping. Every time they breach, it's a sight to behold.

    But a host of threats continues to endanger their existence. That's why we've been fighting for them for years — and now, following a Center lawsuit, the federal government has proposed to protect more than 175,000 square miles of humpbacks' ocean habitat in California, Oregon, Washington and Alaska.

    Tell the National Marine Fisheries Service to finalize these protections now and shield humpbacks from ship strikes, noise, pollution, overfishing, oil spills and entanglements.

  • • It's Not Going Right For North. Atlantic Whales
    North Atlantic Right Whales Now
    Officially 'One Step From Extinction'

    July 16, 2020,(The Guardian)- With their population still struggling to recover from over three centuries of whaling, the North Atlantic right whale is now just “one step from extinction”, according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The IUCN last week moved the whale’s status on their Red List from “endangered” to “critically endangered” – the last stop before the species is considered extinct in the wild.

  • • Enjoy That Shrimp Cocktail While You Still Can
    Coldwater Shrimp: Catch Has
    Been Declining For More Than a Decade

    (EUROFIDH Magazine)- Northern shrimp or Coldwater shrimp (Pandalus borealis) which is found all around the Arctic is the most frequent and economically important species of the decapod genus Pandalus. The firm, tender flesh of this coldwater shrimp is deemed particularly tasty.

    Despite its relatively small size it has been targeted by the fishing industry since the early 20th century. However, the stocks have been declining for several years, probably as a result of global climate change.

    Northern shrimp live in the icy waters of the northern hemisphere. In the Atlantic they are to be found from New England along the Canadian coast, off Greenland, Iceland and Svalbard as far as Norway and the deep sea regions of the North Sea. And in the Pacific, in the Okhotsk Sea, the Bering Strait and in the waters off Alaska.

  • • What We Have to Fear From Endangered Species
    These Invaders, Large and Small, Have Devastating Effects on Wildlife.

    (National Wildlife Federation (NWF)) -Invasive species are among the leading threats to native wildlife. Approximately 42% of threatened or endangered species are at risk due to invasive species.

    Human health and economies are also at risk from invasive species. Their impacts on our natural ecosystems and economy cost billions of dollars each year. Many of our commercial, agricultural, and recreational activities depend on healthy native ecosystems.

  • • The Rice Whale (Not the Bryde's Whale) Is In Trouble
    A New Whale Species in the
    Gulf is already Teetering on Extinction

    (NOLA.com), -Jan. 25, 2021, There was always something a little odd about the exceedingly rare Bryde’s whales that live in the Gulf of Mexico.

    For one thing, the endangered and rarely studied Bryde’s (pronounced broodus) ranges across the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans, but the ones in the Gulf are homebodies, preferring to stay in the deep waters between Louisiana and Florida. They also behave differently. Instead of snagging fish near the surface like their far-flung cousins do, the Bryde’s whales of the Gulf appear to dine in deep water.

  • • 10 Things We Need to Know About Wildlife Trafficking
    Threat to Tens of
    Thousands of Species Globally

    (The Revelator), -Sept. 10, 2020, In August 2020 federal authorities charged a dozen people for illegally trafficking millions of dollars of shark fins in Florida and two other states over the previous seven years.

    According to the indictment, the defendants and their two shell companies also smuggled marijuana across the country and laundered their ill-gotten gains into gold, jewels and other commodities.

    Although the court cases could still take months, the arrests represent a rare victory in the world of wildlife crime.

  • • Pangolins Hunted in India for the China Medical Market
    Hunters Are Targeting
    Endangered Pangolins in India

    Dec.3, 2018, National Geographic -

    A study published November 3 in the journal Nature Conservation by researchers at University of Oxford’s Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU) and the nonprofit World Animal Protection sheds new light on pangolin hunting in India, a country known to be a source of pangolins entering the illegal trade but that’s been little studied.

    Pangolins are scaly, ant-eating mammals that live in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Their scales are in high demand in the illegal wildlife trade, valued for use in traditional Chinese medicine. Two species—Indian pangolin and the Chinese pangolin—live in the northeastern Indian state of Assam, where the research was carried out.

  • • The Threats to the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse
    New Mexico Meadow
    Jumping Mouse Is Endangered

    WildEarth Guardians -The mouse has been extirpated from 70 to 80% of its historic range, which extended from the San Juan Mountains in southwestern Colorado into the Rio Grande Valley in New Mexico and the White Mountains in Arizona. It became a candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act in December 2007, and was listed in June 2014.

    Click to learn how they’re threatened.

  • • China’s Legalization of Rhino Horns & Tiger Parts is Shocking
    Shock as China
    Legalizes Medicinal Trade in Rhino
    Horns and Tiger Parts

    Scientific American, Nov. 9, 2018 - In a move that shocked and horrified many conservationists, China this week opened up two legal markets for rhino horns and tiger body parts. Under China’s new rules, which overturn a 25-year-old ban, farm-raised tiger and rhino “products” can be approved for use in medical research or by accredited doctors in hospitals, despite the fact that the body parts have no known medicinal value.

    China also approved limited trade in antique tiger and rhino products.

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